Chip’s Radiation Therapy Tale

Published on October 4, 2019.
Last Updated July 11, 2021.
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How radiation therapy helped successfully treat Chip's cancer of the nose.

Chip is a 15-year old Bichon Frise who has a loving brother Dale (also a Bichon Frise) and gorgeous owners Pat & Jan.

Chip’s owners noticed that he had started to develop a large swelling on the top of his head and immediately became extremely concerned.

Chip first visited his local vet, Pittwater Animal Hospital who then referred him onto our wonderful Medical Oncology department. The team were sadly able to diagnose Chip with nasal transitional cell carcinoma (cancer of the nose).

After further discussions with Pat, Jan and the Medical Oncology team, the best way forward for Chip was to have Radiation Therapy. Definitive treatment is when Radiation Therapy is delivered with an intent for longer term control, to give Chip a much longer time with his loving family.

What Treatment Did Chip Undertake?

Radiation Therapy, is the use of high-energy x-rays to treat cancer.

It is a highly-localised therapy, which means it affects only the part of the body where the radiation is targeted i.e. the cancerous area.

During Chip’s treatments, he was put under a general anaesthetic each time as the patient needs to be extremely still for this procedure.

During the time Chip was undergoing his treatments, you could visually see the cancer decrease and melt away which was just simply remarkable!

How Did The Treatment Go?

Chip has been back with his family for nearly a month now and has experienced very minor side effects from his Radiation Treatment. He is very happy to be back at home with his brother and his loving owners who had missed having him around 24/7.

We are all so happy for you Chip!

About the Author

Bec Moss

Veterinarian
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Cancer, Dogs, Oncology
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