Keep Your Pets Safe This Festive Season

Published on September 11, 2019.
Last Updated July 11, 2021.
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Keep Your Pets Safe This Festive Season

The festive seasons are just about upon us and this is usually a time for over-exposure of potentially dangerous hazards for our beloved pets.

While these are periods of celebration and sharing, it’s important to remember that sharing certain treats and other festive items with your pets presents a range of painful and life-threatening conditions for dogs and cats.

SASH is constantly treating pets that have been given, or sneaked away with, seemingly harmless foods like:

  • Chocolate – chocolate contains a stimulant called theobromine, a bit like caffeine, while tasty, can be severely poisonous to dogs and cats.
  • Mince Pies and Christmas Puddings – all grapes, raisins, currants and sultanas are toxic to dogs; as are foods that contain them – which means no mince pies or puddings for your pooch!
  • Macadamia nuts – often found in biscuits or eaten as a decadent Christmas snack, these nuts cause severe illness in dogs.
  • Garlic, onion and chives – found in many festive foods like gravy, stuffing and sausages, all Allium species are poisonous to dogs.
  • Alcohol – alcohol can cause severe liver and brain damage in animals. As little as a tablespoon can lead to problems for your cat or dog.

There are also Christmas ornaments and other items to be mindful of that have the potential of being risks to pets like:

  • Tinsel – while it might look like a lot of fun to play with, tinsel can cause dangerous blockages in an animal’s stomach if ingested.
  • Snow Globes – imported versions can contain antifreeze. As little as one tablespoon can be fatal for a cat.
  • Candles – they may create a cosy atmosphere, but candle flames can burn paws and the curious noses of furry friends.
  • Fairy Lights – Cats are curious little creatures and will try to chew on anything, including fairy lights which can burn and even electrocute them.

If you are concerned about your beloved mate, your local vet should usually be your first port of call. If your local vet is not available, SASH has a 24 hour, 7 day Emergency service and is open throughout the Christmas and New Year holiday period.

About the Author

Bec Moss

Veterinarian
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