Surgery for a fractured femoral head

Published on June 17, 2020.
Last Updated July 12, 2021.
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Meg the Jack Russel's close call with an automobile.

The breaks screeched, but it was too late. Meg’s family will never forget the sight of their little Meggie rebounding off the metal and being thrown to the side of the road.

“I thought she was dead.” Meg’s family told us of their beloved Jack Russel.

Thankfully, and miraculously, Meg wasn’t dead, but she was injured, and she needed emergency veterinary attention, as soon as possible.

Meg initially presented to her local vet, Singleton Veterinary Hospital where she was stabilised and given pain relief. She was then referred to our Central Coast Hospital to see surgery specialist, Dr John Culvenor. As you can see from the first x-ray, Meg was very broken – she had fractured both of her femoral heads and needed surgery to repair the damage.

Once admitted, Meg was prepped for surgery (by her favourite nurse, Elise – pictured below) to repair her painful hips. And you can see from the second x-ray, although she may now look like ‘The Bionic Pup’ Meg’s surgery was a complete success! Her journey, however, is not yet over as Meg will be visiting us again soon for rehabilitation with our amazing Rehab Therapist Bec Hervey.

About the Author

Bec Moss

Veterinarian
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